Support for blink(1) now available in ProTally!

I wrote ProTally last year so our volunteers running ProPresenter could know when their source was on screen or about to be on screen. It has been very helpful in minimizing our mistakes by making distracting graphic changes while on-air. It supports tally data from our Ross Carbonite switchers but I’ve also written support for the TSL 3.1 protocol, Blackmagic ATEM switchers, OBS Studio scenes, and most recently, Bitfocus Companion.

I recently picked up a blink(1) to test out for another project I’m working on. If you’ve not heard of it, the blink(1) is a small $30 USB device with LEDs built in, designed to give you a quick-glance notice of anything on your computer. The creators have made libraries in several popular programming languages, like Node.js (the language ProTally is written in), to interact with it.

 

I decided to get my feet wet and learn about the device’s capabilities by integrating it with ProTally. Since ProTally can read and work with tally data from so many different types of sources, that means it’s already primed to take that tally data and act on it in different ways, not just on-screen.

So, I am pleased to announce, that ProTally now supports up to 4 blink(1) devices that can mirror the color the user chooses for an on-screen tally box. The user can choose between showing the tally color on a box on their monitor (like normal), a connected blink(1) device, or both. If you are using multiple tally boxes but don’t own an equal number of blink(1) devices, you can also choose to share the blink(1) across multiple tally boxes, and the higher box will get priority.

 

The latest release of ProTally supporting blink(1) devices as tally lights is available on Github now, so go check it out!

ProTally 1.2.0 with Blackmagic ATEM support available

I spent some time this past week writing and testing support for ProTally with Blackmagic ATEM switchers. I didn’t have one to develop with, and after posting on a discussion group about the software, a new friend sent me a unit to work on. Thanks again, Kyle!

Version 1.2.0 now supports:

  • Blackmagic ATEM switchers – it will auto discover any ATEM switchers on the network, or you can manually type in an IP Address as well
  • Ross Carbonite Black, Carbonite Black Solo, and Graphite switchers

And I now have a Windows release build in addition to a MacOS release build!

Screen Shot 2018-09-15 at 12.12.47 AM

Screen Shot 2018-09-15 at 12.13.51 AMScreen Shot 2018-09-15 at 12.13.11 AM

Screen Shot 2018-09-15 at 12.14.08 AM
It now supports more device types!

You can download the binaries for free here: https://github.com/josephdadams/ProTally/releases/tag/v1.2.0

If the software is beneficial to you, drop me a line and let me know!

Two Quick Updates

Just two quick updates, if you are using my software.

First, I’ve added a couple more features to the Countdowns/Clock system. You can now have a custom name for each countdown, which is pretty helpful. And, the page now displays a progress bar/meter that shows how long until the next page refresh, which has been increased to 15 seconds.

Screen Shot 2018-07-02 at 3.05.06 PM

Second, my VideoHub custom panel for Dashboard will now auto detect how many inputs/outputs you have on your router, which is mainly used for building out the drop down lists of inputs and outputs to choose a route.

Hope this helps! You can get the latest versions on my Github repository.

Controlling BlackMagic VideoHub from Ross Dashboard

Here’s a quick post to share how to control your BlackMagic VideoHub from a Ross Dashboard Custom Panel.

If you have any BlackMagic VideoHub router, it comes with software that allows you to make routing changes over the network. It’s pretty simple and easy to use.

What you may not know is that it can also accept telnet commands by default over port 9990. This means you can control it from a command line, or by sending TCP messages.

Ross Dashboard has a built in function, rosstalk.sendMessage which is designed for sending simple TCP messages. Combine these two things together, and now you can have a button on your own custom panel where you can make a video route easily.

In Dashboard, create a new custom panel, and add a button to that panel.

Screen Shot 2018-04-30 at 2.54.39 PM

Under Tasks, click “Add”, and type in this code:


var command = "VIDEO OUTPUT ROUTING:\r\n";

var videoHub_address = "192.168.1.100";

var destination = 5;
var source = 25;

command = command + (destination -1) + " " + (source - 1) + "\r\n\r\n";

rosstalk.sendMessage(videoHub_address, 9990, command, null);

The router operates with zero based indexes, which means if your destination number is 5, for example, the router treats it internally as 4. So, this script just substracts those numbers internally before submitting the command to the router.

Happy routing!