ProTally 1.7 with support for Roland Smart Tally!

In my last post, I mentioned my partnership with Tony at Calvary Chapel in Las Vegas, writing software to support their Roland V-60HD switcher.

As I was reading the specs on that switcher, I noticed it had a feature Roland called “Smart Tally”. It allows users to pull up a web page on their phones and monitor sources for being in Preview or Program live as the switcher is used.

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I knew I just had to add this support to ProTally, so while working to implement the remote control module, I snooped how the Smart Tally service worked and came up with a way for ProTally to monitor for tally changes the same way mobile users accessing the server directly would.

It was actually pretty straightforward: When a user goes to to the IP address of the Roland V-60HD in a browser, they are presented with a list of addresses. Clicking on any of these addresses then loads a page where the browser repeatedly requests this url in the background:

http://[ipaddress]/tally/[tally address]/status

This status page simply returns three values: unselected, selected (in Preview), and onair (in Program).

Since I wouldn’t have access to the Roland switcher to develop and test with, I needed a solution to be able to test locally. I’ve been learning the Python programming language recently, so I decided to whip up a simple web server in Python to emulate this page request, with it turning one of the three values based on the seconds of the clock. If the time of day was between 0 and 20 seconds, it would return unselected. If between 20 and 40, it would return selected, and finally, if between 40 and 60, it would return onair. This was a simple way to emulate the setup of having a Roland switcher with Smart Tally.

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This simple Python script made testing a lot easier!

This feature has been released, so you can go get it now up on the Github repo!

Controlling Planning Center LIVE with a Stream Deck

In my last post, I mentioned a great tool, Companion, that integrates with the Elgato Stream Deck. I’ve had the opportunity to write a few modules for it to extend its control capabilities, like controlling a CueServer, or my own software, ProTally.

If you work in tech for a church, chances are that you use or have at least heard of Planning Center Online to manage your worship services and people. PCO has a feature for their Services product called Services LIVE that allows you to designate where you are at in a service flow while a service is ongoing, which updates anyone who may be watching. It also records the times so you can look back later and see things like “Did that song we said would take 5 minutes actually take more like 6 minutes and 30 seconds?” It’s a very useful tool.

The interface to advance a LIVE plan, however, has not been the best for our volunteers. Even within the PCO app, the buttons to advance a plan to the next item are rather tiny, and some of my team have trouble knowing whether or not they hit the button.

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This is the standard PCO Live interface. The small double arrows at the bottom left and right of the screen are the controls. Our volunteers have a hard time pressing these.

One thing that makes Planning Center Online great is that they love developers, and they’ve made a very extensive Application Programming Interface (API) available for anyone to use. This means you can get access to your service and plan data without having to actually click and browse the website.

I delved into that API this past week and used it to create a new module for Companion. One of the caveats of using the API is that in order to advance a live plan, you have to know both the service type ID and the plan ID. This requires traversing the API data some and making multiple requests. If you’re a programmer, this makes sense. If you’re just an end-user, it may not be as straightforward. So, I set out to make something easy enough for anyone to use.

Here is a walkthrough video on how the module works:

What it actually does:

  1. When you first load the module and supply it with the authentication tokens, it requests all of the available service types and stores that internally.
    https://api.planningcenteronline.com/services/v2/service_types
  2. Then it asks for the next 7 upcoming plans for each service type based on the list that was just retrieved. This is then used to build the drop down list so you can choose your plan.
    https://api.planningcenteronline.com/services/v2/service_types/${serviceTypeId}/plans?filter=future&per_page=7
  3. When you send a “Previous” or “Next” command, it first asks for the LIVE information for that selected plan.
    https://api.planningcenteronline.com/services/v2/service_types/${serviceTypeId}/plans/${planId}/live
  4. It checks for who the current controller of the plan is, and compares that to an internal variable in Companion that represents the owner of the authentication token.
  5. If the current controller is null, a command is sent to toggle control to the token owner, and the returning value of the current controller is stored in that internal variable so we know who “we” are for next time.
    https://api.planningcenteronline.com/services/v2/service_types/${serviceTypeId}/plans/${planId}/live/toggle_control
  6. If the current controller is not null, a toggle command is sent to release control of the plan to no one, and then a toggle command is immediately sent again so that control is toggled to us. The reason for this is that if our authentication key is not the current controller, the API will return an error when we try to advance the plan.
  7. Now that we know we are in control, the current controller value returned by the API is stored as an internal variable, and then the next or previous command is sent to advance the plan.
    https://api.planningcenteronline.com/services/v2/service_types/${serviceTypeId}/plans/${planId}/live/go_to_next_item

Because Node.js is an asychronous programming language, all of this is done through Promises, which is similar in concept to a callback function, however it allows for cleaner and easier to read code.

So, stay tuned for this module to become available in the next stable release of Companion, and if you’re willing to try it out in development mode, it’s available now!

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The PCO Live module in action!

Support for blink(1) now available in ProTally!

I wrote ProTally last year so our volunteers running ProPresenter could know when their source was on screen or about to be on screen. It has been very helpful in minimizing our mistakes by making distracting graphic changes while on-air. It supports tally data from our Ross Carbonite switchers but I’ve also written support for the TSL 3.1 protocol, Blackmagic ATEM switchers, OBS Studio scenes, and most recently, Bitfocus Companion.

I recently picked up a blink(1) to test out for another project I’m working on. If you’ve not heard of it, the blink(1) is a small $30 USB device with LEDs built in, designed to give you a quick-glance notice of anything on your computer. The creators have made libraries in several popular programming languages, like Node.js (the language ProTally is written in), to interact with it.

 

I decided to get my feet wet and learn about the device’s capabilities by integrating it with ProTally. Since ProTally can read and work with tally data from so many different types of sources, that means it’s already primed to take that tally data and act on it in different ways, not just on-screen.

So, I am pleased to announce, that ProTally now supports up to 4 blink(1) devices that can mirror the color the user chooses for an on-screen tally box. The user can choose between showing the tally color on a box on their monitor (like normal), a connected blink(1) device, or both. If you are using multiple tally boxes but don’t own an equal number of blink(1) devices, you can also choose to share the blink(1) across multiple tally boxes, and the higher box will get priority.

 

The latest release of ProTally supporting blink(1) devices as tally lights is available on Github now, so go check it out!

Using a Stream Deck as a Production Controller, Revisited

One of my first posts on this blog detailed how I wrote software in Node.js to interface with an Elgato Stream Deck to control some of our production equipment, interfacing with the video switchers, router, Ross Dashboard, etc. It’s time to revisit that.

We’ve been using my controller now every week in our control rooms and tech booths for about a year. My team loves it. It integrates into our centralized production workflow, where each deck sends commands to a central Dashboard panel, which runs the command, and then sends out updates to all the connected stream decks.

However, I haven’t had much time to make it a better product for other people. I wrote support for the Stream Deck Mini when that was released, but that’s about it. I haven’t had time or cause to do much else with it. So, for that reason, I wanted to share with you a piece of software that is under constant, active development: Bitfocus Companion.

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Companion is written in Node.js and packaged in Electron just like my product, so it can run on Mac, Windows, or Linux. But it can do so much more than my controller! One of the best features is that it has a web-based management interface, so you can add actions to buttons easily and on-the-fly. It supports a ton of production equipment and chances are good that your gear is already on the supported list, or, perhaps someone can create a module for it.

I was asked to join the development team recently for Companion, so I’ve started making some modules for Companion to integrate with software and gear that we have. I’ve created a module for Interactive Technologies’ CueServer, which we have in a couple of our venues here.

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Here are some actions you can perform on a CueServer now with the module I created for Companion.
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An example of a key down action for triggering a CueServer macro in Companion.

If you use ProTally, my on-screen tally box notification software, and want to integrate with Companion, I made a module for that too! Make sure to go download the latest ProTally release which supports this feature! With Companion, in addition to Preview and Program windows, you can also send a Beacon, which flashes at a custom rate and color. Check this video out for a demo:

Both of these modules are available in the bleeding edge builds of Companion and will be included in the next stable release soon.

So, if you’re looking for a great production controller that integrates with the Stream Deck, go check out Companion! It’s only going to get better from here!

 

Using Node.js and a Raspberry Pi to monitor Streaming ACN network for DMX changes and trigger actions

Awhile back, I wrote about the Shade Controller I created using Node.js and a USB relay running on a Raspberry Pi Zero. It works great. We can raise and lower the shade from anywhere on the network. However, I’ve always wanted a way to control this a little more automatically. The lighting volunteer is typically the person who operates the remote for the shade, so I really wanted a way to automate that part of the process for them so the shade can raise and lower exactly when we want it to, without them having to use an extra tool or device.

As I was working on some networking changes to one of our lighting consoles (we use Jands L5 consoles running Chroma-Q’s Vista 3), I had an idea… What if we could monitor the Streaming ACN lighting network for data changes just like any lighting node, and use that to trigger an action?

If you’ve not heard of Streaming ACN (sometimes called sACN or its official name E 1.31), it is an ethernet based protocol for sending DMX address and value information from a lighting console to receiver nodes which then relay the DMX information to lighting fixtures. It uses multicast traffic to send the information so it is very fast and efficient. At my church, we have several DMX universes of lighting information going over the network for each auditorium, controlling all of the light fixtures.

Luckily for me, a base protocol module for E 1.31 was already available for Node.js. So, using that module, I sat down and prototyped a solution and had something working in just a couple of hours. I’m calling my software sACN Translator. I’ve deployed it to a Raspberry Pi for production. It supports a simple REST API to allow you to control which universes it should listen to, as well as the fixtures to run triggers for. I also created a simple web interface which utilizes this API.

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Here is the simple web interface which interacts with the REST API.

Here is how I set it up on our system to trigger the shade controller. I started by adding two fixtures to the L5 console on Universe 1 (where I happened to have some spare room in my DMX addresses). I called these fixtures “Shades Up” and “Shades Down”, with DMX Addresses 511 and 512.

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Here are the two “fixtures” on the layout, with notes attached.
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I labeled the fixtures as generic “utility” fixtures with 1 DMX address each.

Then, I added entries in sACN Translator to monitor Universe 1 on the network and look for value changes to fixture addresses 511 and 512. I set it to run an HTTP trigger any time the values reaches 255 (100%). So, when I put the Shades Down fixture at 100% on the lighting console, the software sees that value, looks for a match in its list of fixtures, and then runs the corresponding HTTP request on the Raspberry Pi Zero connected to the USB relay to trigger the action which lowers the shade.

Here is a video of it in action:

Pretty cool! I decided to use separate fixture addresses for each trigger action, but I didn’t have to. I could have just one fixture and watch for two separate lighting values.

So now, all the operator has to do is run the cues like normal, and the programming will do the rest! I’ve made this software available for free on my Github repository. Let me know how it works for you!

Using Google Apps Script with user input to automate repetitive tasks in Google Docs

Do you find yourself ever doing repetitive tasks over and over again in Google Docs? (Or any of the Google Suite Apps?) I sure do. At my church, we create a Google Doc every week for all of the “talking points”, the parts of the service that aren’t song or sermon, where we script out what someone needs to say or communicate during that portion.

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Here is a sample document that we use each week.

A couple years ago, I started creating template files to help my team do this every week, because having the template already there with some common headers, the service date, etc. removed the barrier to get down to writing the actual words. Creating the files wasn’t too complicated, and after awhile, I started making them “in bulk”, where I would sit down and just make 3-4 months worth of documents at a time, making copies of my master template, editing the new file and updating the date, etc. Then we added a second auditorium, which doubled the amount of documents I needed to create.

With the new year, it was time to create more documents, so I decided this time around that I would create a script to help automate this task using the framework within Google Apps Script.

If you’ve not heard of or used Google Apps Script (GAS), it’s a scripting language based on Javascript, for light-weight application development. All of the code runs on Google’s servers to interact with your documents. If you’ve ever used an “add-on” in Google Apps, it’s using this scripting framework.

It’s pretty easy to use if you know Javascript, and it’s easy to get started. From any document, just go to Tools > Script Editor. This opens a new tab where you can start writing Apps Script.

Here is my script:


function myFunction()
{
var ui = DocumentApp.getUi();

var templateDocId = '[templateid]'; // put the document ID of the master template file here

var prompt_numberOfDocs = ui.prompt('How many Talking Point Documents do you want to create?');
var prompt_startingDate = ui.prompt('What is the starting date? Please enter in MM/dd/yyyy.');

var numberOfDocs = parseInt(prompt_numberOfDocs.getResponseText());
var startingDate = prompt_startingDate.getResponseText();

var prompt_venueResponse = ui.prompt('Venue', 'Create Documents for both Auditoriums? If no, please type in the Venue Title and click "No".', ui.ButtonSet.YES_NO);

var venueTitle = '';

var bothAuditoriums = true;

if (prompt_venueResponse.getSelectedButton() == ui.Button.NO)
{
venueTitle = prompt_venueResponse.getResponseText();
bothAuditoriums = false;
}

var date = new Date(startingDate);

var htmlOutput = HtmlService
.createHtmlOutput('Creating ' + numberOfDocs + ' documents. Please stand by...

')
.setWidth(300)
.setHeight(100);

ui.showModalDialog(htmlOutput, 'Talking Points - Task Running');

for (var i = 0; i < numberOfDocs; i++)
{
var loopDate = new Date(date.getTime()+ ((i * 7) * 3600000 * 24)); // uses the looping interval to get the starting date and add 7 days to it, creating a new date object
var documentName = 'Talking Points - ' + Utilities.formatDate(loopDate, Session.getScriptTimeZone(), "MMMM dd, yyyy");
var documentDate = Utilities.formatDate(loopDate, Session.getScriptTimeZone(), "MM/dd/yyyy");
if (bothAuditoriums)
{
createNewTalkingPointDocument(templateDocId, documentName + ' (Aud 1)', 'Aud 1', documentDate);
createNewTalkingPointDocument(templateDocId, documentName + ' (Aud 2)', 'Aud 2', documentDate);
}
else
{
documentName += ' (' + venueTitle + ')';
createNewTalkingPointDocument(templateDocId, documentName, venueTitle, documentDate);
}
}

htmlOutput = HtmlService
.createHtmlOutput('google.script.host.close();')
.setWidth(300)
.setHeight(100);
ui.showModalDialog(htmlOutput, 'Talking Points - Task Running');
}

function createNewTalkingPointDocument(templateDocumentId, documentName, venueTitle, documentDate)
{
//Make a copy of the template file
var documentId = DriveApp.getFileById(templateDocumentId).makeCopy().getId();

//Rename the copied file
DriveApp.getFileById(documentId).setName(documentName);

//Get the document body as a variable
var body = DocumentApp.openById(documentId).getBody();

//Insert the entries into the document
body.replaceText('##Venue##', venueTitle);
body.replaceText('##Date##', documentDate);
}

Once you have a script in place, you can choose triggers for when it should run, like when it is opened, or on a schedule, etc.

Here is the new template with the script in action:

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First, I ask how many documents should be created. 1, 5, 500, whatever I need.

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Next, I ask for the starting date. We specifically use these for Sunday services, so I’ve programmed the script to take this starting date and then calculate every 7 days when creating multiple documents.

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Then, I ask the user if they want to create documents for both auditoriums, or if this is for a special service or off-site service, etc. Typically we want them for both auditoriums, but the one-off feature makes things easy for those types of services too.

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As the script runs, it displays this dialog box. Creating that many documents can take awhile, and I wanted the user to be aware of this. The box goes away automatically when the process is completed.

Now that we have this, I can pass the task on to anyone on our team, anytime they need these documents! And it saves a good bit of time. I definitely spent less time creating this script than I would have spent creating the 3-4 months worth of documents manually, and now I never have to do that again!

How can you use Google Apps Script to automate some of your more repetitive tasks?